Question Time

Boy, I’m really tired. OK. Not just a little tired. I am about cross-eyed I’m so tired. Ugh. But I had two questions I posted in my Writing Group today. So far, we have not come to any conclusive answer so I bring them to you.

1. Can you successfully blend First Person POV with Third Omniscient?
– See, I’m writing this Fairy Tale type serial now. And Fairy Tales have narrators. There I am, writing along, really getting the hang of this 3rd omni and BAM! my narrator starts talking in the first person. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot much? But so far, it’s working. I think. We’ll see what everyone else thinks when this episode is done.

Episode? What?

Yes. You heard me correctly. It’s a serial, remember? And that leads us right into our next question…

B. Can you break down the steps of the character arc into the episodes of a longer work?
– Don’t tell me you cannot because I’m sure as hell going to try. I’ve already identified the five steps, the basic action that must occur within each episode, plus the moral to be gleaned from the episode – and for shits and giggles, I’m adding at least one Fairy Tale trope to each episode.

I might be as mad as the White Queen, but I’m having fun. I really enjoy writing – it exorcises the angels, right?

Side note: My mind totally just wandered off for like 20 minutes, and I’ve no idea where I was going now that I’m back. So. Let me leave you with this, my favorite bit of today’s writing:

No matter the cost of the silk trappings, a cow is still a pig. No. That isn’t right. You cannot make a silk purse with a… oh, never mind. Lady Woolverton was gauche, and no amount of education since her elevation from tart to married tart would change that.

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Question Time

  1. jamieverse

    1. I think if you’re writing two different characters, one of whom thinks in First Person, while the other is presented in Third Omniscient, it could work. Being consistent is the tricky part.

    B. Yes. Definitely.

    I look forward to the finished tale!

    Like

    Reply
    1. lauramichaela Post author

      It’s one character. She’s telling the story involving others with lapses into talking about herself. I’ll see if I can find something that showcases it.

      Like

      Reply
      1. jamieverse

        Interesting! Far more challenging to write it in one character. I would love to see how you swing this. You enjoy a challenge, don’t you? 😉

        Like

  2. lauramichaela Post author

    This isn’t the BEST example, but the last paragraph is one of my favorites. I’ve got a better example I’ll dig out in a minute…

    Lord Mondragon shifted from one foot to the other. The problem was obvious – how to allay her fears, prepare her for the trials of the Blood Court? Releasing the breath he did not realize he held, he realized nothing could prepare her for what was to come.

    “Of course I am, child,” he said rather forcefully. Clearing his throat, he continued, “Before we descend, however, I want you to know that -”

    The cloying scent of too much lavender filled the room, seeping through the walls, through the vents, sinking to my room below. “Not thinking of sharing Court secrets with the uninitiated are you, Your Grace?” asked Lady Woolverton.

    Lady Woolverton. I growled, low in my throat, and the winds whipped into a frenzy, hammering at the windows of the Blue Parlor. That filthy courtesan who seduced my consort, setting into motion my freefall. All at the behest of Adaline, the usurper. My sweet Albert was rewarded with a new Queen and eternal youth while that treacherous bitch, Maud, was rewarded with the hand of a lowly baron.

    Unaware of the sordid past of the court or her inhabitants, Olivia was intelligent enough to be wary. Pasting a smile onto her face, she turned to the older woman. “Well met, Lady Woolverton. Will Lilliana join me this night?

    She refers, of course, to the sweet girl the old harpy managed to birth after years of lost babes. A plain girl with none of her mother’s flash – or coarseness, she was also one of the few to treat Olivia with kindness. And Lady Woolverton could not speak well, or often, enough of her.
    No matter the cost of the silk trappings, a cow is still a pig. No. That isn’t right. You cannot make a silk purse with a… oh, never mind. Lady Woolverton was gauche, and no amount of education since her elevation from tart to married tart would change that.

    Like

    Reply
  3. lauramichaela Post author

    Here’s another:

    Olivia rolled her shoulders, as if dispelling the built up tension. In a rather uncharacteristic moment, she wanted to reach out, to throttle Mrs. Jackson’s pudgy neck until the woman apologized. Or stopped breathing. I voted for the latter, of course.

    Like

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s